What Is Passover and Why Is It Celebrated?

Passover is a holiday celebrating emancipation from the slavery of ancient Egypt. It’s also one of the world’s oldest religious festivals, with roots tracing back to Judaism. The festival takes place for 8 days and lasts from sunset on March 25th until nightfall on April 1st.

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It’s celebrated by Jews all around the world, who commemorate this event with various traditions such as eating matzo bread (unleavened bread), drinking wine or grape juice, reading the Haggadah (a story about Pharaoh) and singing songs like “Dayenu” which means “it would have been enough”. Some Jewish people observe Passover by avoiding food that contains chametz- anything made from wheat, oats or rye.

What is Passover

Passover is a Jewish holiday that celebrates the Israelites’ liberation from Egyptian slavery. It typically falls in March or April and lasts for eight days, starting with the first full moon of spring. Passover commemorates events that occurred over 3,300 years ago in ancient Egypt when Moses led his people out of bondage to freedom after God revealed himself as their redeemer and liberator. Celebrating Passover promotes unity among family members and friends who gather together during this time period.

Why is the holiday called Passover?

Passover, one of the most important Jewish holidays celebrates the liberation of Jews from slavery in ancient Egypt. This week-long festival is observed by many different Jews worldwide and falls at a time when Jews are preparing for springtime. The word Passover comes from the Hebrew “pesach” which means to pass over or to skip, this is because God passed over or skipped destroying Pharaoh’s army during the tenth plague on Israelites as he was drowning all of his other enemies’ armies. Another interesting fact about Passover is that it has been celebrated for more than three thousand years! You can also check out Passover Programs

How is Passover celebrated?

Passover is a holiday celebrated by Jews around the world. Passover celebrates freedom from slavery in ancient Egypt and commemorates the Jewish exodus from Egypt. Passover lasts eight days, beginning on the 15th day of Nisan and ending with an elaborate meal called “seder” (meaning order). Passover is typically celebrated in homes with family members gathering for ritual meals, reading passages about Passover’s significance, singing songs like “Dayenu,” which means enough for us that God delivered us from our enemies’ hands.

What do people eat on Passover?

Passover is a holiday that people observe by eating matzo, shank bone soup, and other traditional foods. The people who celebrate Passover are Jewish people of the Jewish faith. But what do people eat on Passover? In this blog post, we will discuss some of the typical foods eaten on Passover day!

Passover is a fantastic holiday for kids.

In the Passover seder, children play an important part. They are frequently asked to perform a drama about Moses and Pharaoh or to create crafts inspired by the ten plagues. The storey of Passover begins with the youngest child at the table asking the Four Questions, or mah nishtana in Hebrew. It contains the most famous Passover question, “Why is this night different from all other nights?”

Children also get to hide an afikomen, a unique piece of matzah that is saved to be eaten after the meal. The afikomen is significant because it symbolises freedom from slavery, but it also signifies the prize, or treat, that children will receive if an adult finds it. Passover is a pleasant festival that is made all the more meaningful by the specific responsibilities that children play.

It requires a miracle.

The miracles of Passover are numerous, and they have sparked controversy for decades. “Why don’t we see similar miracles now?” some modern-day individuals question.

“The idea that an enslaved people were able to flee one of ancient history’s most powerful tyrannies is amazing in and of itself,” Rabbi Patz argues.

Many “miracles,” such as the splitting of the Red Sea, are actually quite straightforward to explain. “From a historical standpoint, the passage through the sea of reeds, as the Red Sea was known at the time,” adds Rabbi Patz. “The Israelites came from the country’s inland region, now known as the West Bank. They had never seen or experienced the sea or tides before. They arrived at the seashore late at night when it was dark.

There was a strong wind blowing. They came there during low tide, when the water was 10 feet deep and difficult to traverse before the tide flowed out. Add to this the fact that people used to fill the shallow section of the sea with rocks so they could walk across it at low tide. The Israelites made it across, but the sea came rushing in again, and the Egyptians were unable to cross. Is this some sort of miracle? It is, without a doubt, a miracle. The Israelites believed they wouldn’t be able to flee, yet they did. What’s the proof? Today, the Jewish people are able to relate the storey.”

A celebration of hope and possibility

Although Passover marks Egypt’s liberation from slavery, enslavement today can take numerous forms. “Redemption is at the heart of Passover’s relevance in today’s world,” says Rabbi Bregman. “While the occasion commemorates a physical liberation for Jews, the heart of Passover is to focus on spiritual liberation. The chametz we don’t consume symbolises the ‘leavening’ in us, i.e., the arrogance and ego that keeps us from reaching our full potential.”

“Passover commemorates the possibility and hope of redemption yet to come,” Rabbi Patz continues. In the book of Zachariah, there is a statement that I like: ‘We are prisoners of hope.’ We may not have many reasons to be optimistic, but we will not lose hope. By nature, Jews are pessimists. The claim that there is hope for the Jews, and for humanity, and that justice, mercy, and peace can exist is the core reason for celebrating Passover—that we were slaves and are now free. Now that you’ve mastered Passover, it’s time to put your skills to use.